Strength and Conditioning Coaching

5 Reasons Strength and Conditioning Coaching is changing

This is a must-read for coaches. Derek Hansen has written it. Who is a renounced strength and conditioning coaching in Canada?

He has a background in the sprints and has worked with some of the truly great coaches.

Including the late Charlie Francis and Al Vermeil.

Derek is the only strength and conditioning coaching to win a championship ring for both the NFL (San Francisco 49ers in 1982) and NBA (Chicago Bulls during the Michael Jordan era).

So Derek is experienced, intelligent, and also a top bloke.

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Five Reasons Why the Role of the Pro Sports Strength and Conditioning Coaching is Changing

January 15, 2014, by Derek

– Derek M. Hansen –

Over the last five years.

I have noticed some gradual changes in the strength and conditioning coaching role at the professional sports level.

Some of my thoughts are based on casual observations.

But also frank discussions with coaches who are currently working in the professional ranks. Also, coaches who have moved on from the pros to other sport levels – mostly college jobs.

But one thing is clear: Today’s strength and conditioning coaching profession is not the same challenge as it was 15 to 20 years ago.

There are some emerging realities in professional sports that make it a different world.

And one in which coaches may have to re-invent themselves.

While some coaches interpret these changes due to innovations and progress, others – especially strength and conditioning coaching purists – see it as a step.

But one thing is clear: Today’s strength and conditioning coaching profession is not the same challenge as it was 15 to 20 years ago.

There are some emerging realities in professional sports that make it a different world, and one in which coaches may have to re-invent themselves.

While some coaches interpret these changes as the result of innovations and progress, others – especially strength and conditioning coaching purists – see it as a step backward away from the art of coaching and the development of a true coaching position.

Read the full article here.

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What’s the difference between strength coaches and personal trainers?

The only real difference arises in the specificity of the strength coach compared to the personal trainer.

Although this is hardly an accurate representation across the spectrum.

A personal trainer will generally operate within a nominal gym space, with no specific emphasis on clientele.

The personal trainers who work in big chain gyms tend to acquire as many clients as possible and tend to focus on 1 or 2 areas of specialization: weight loss and muscle gain.

The clientele these trainers will typically acquire (depending on the gym’s demographic).

Will typically be older individuals trying to gain muscle to minimize age-related sarcopenia (muscle loss), or rehabilitation of old injuries, or on the flip-side, stay-at-home parents looking for somebody to design weight-loss and muscle building workouts for them.

As I said, these are broad generalizations, but in my experience. This is the average across the board.

On the other hand, the strength coach will generally work in an athletic training facility of some kind.

That focuses specifically on training athletes for athletic performance and injury reduction.

Strength coaches have a particular niche that they are trying to fill, while the personal trainer is more generalized.

That said, you can absolutely find personal trainers that specialize in strength training for sports performance.

And strength coaches that work with a wider variety of clients.

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Why are there so many poor fitness and strength and conditioning coaching and terrible advice?

For the same reasons that some barbers are better than others. Some doctors are better than others, and some dentist is better than others, and so on.

Even among the trainers possessing the same certifications from the most recognized programs like NASM, AASM, ACE, etc.

You will find those that are just more knowledgeable and effective than others.

Many variables can be the cause of this.

Some have a more thorough understanding of the materials.

And can, therefore, translate it to better actionable advice.

Others have more experience and understand that science does not play out in real life in that same manner it does in the lab.

Still, others have formed their own hypothesis about it all.

And follow their gut instinct to some degree.

Whatever it is, it is what distinguishes a bad trainer from a good trainer from a great trainer.

Of course, you may want to consider that you may be the one wrong. Not to be confrontational, but there is no way to conclude what you are specifically referring to as “terrible” advice.

Especially since, as you stated, “so many” are giving it. From my view, I would like to know what qualifies you as the expert and them as being so terrible? An example might be useful.

Just saying…., food for thought!

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