How to Improve Philippines Sports

How to Improve Philippines Sports

In light of the situation with the POC Senate Hearing scheduled for November 16. I bring up this old article from pinoyexchange. It seems nothing much has changed. 

So can you suggest in the comments more Ways How to Improve Philippines Sports?

Thread started by Coolenz from Pinoyexchange.com.

The Original thread is available here http://www.pinoyexchange.com/forums/showthread.php?t=585350

 

Like many Pexers and sport-loving Filipinos across the archipelago and worldwide, I am sick and tired of Philippine sports’ present situation.  The country’s declining performance in major international events like the Southeast Asian Games, Asian Games, and Olympics.

While in the recent London Olympics, our athletes were nowhere near world-class standards. The only one who advanced to the next round of his event was boxer Mark Barriga. Unfortunately, Barriga only made it to the Round of 16. Yet, of course, I was no longer surprised by their performance. At the same time, they went up against well-trained, well-equipped athletes and were given all the support they need.

Also, we can’t blame the athletes for their lackluster performance. How can we expect Marestella Torres to make a personal best jump if she can’t even train at the Rizal Memorial oval and had to travel outside Metro Manila just to practice?

How can we expect Hidlyn Diaz to make a solid lift when she trained on rusted barbels and had to use another facility that is fully equipped? How can we expect archers Mark Javier and Rachel Cabral to be on target when using broken arrows aimed at a makeshift target?

They can defy the odds in the Southeast Asian Games and perhaps the Asian Games but not the Olympics.

Having a meager budget for Philippine sports is a big factor. Hence it is not an excuse for not winning medals. However, there should be a collaboration from the private sector, and a sound long-term sports program should be in place.

If you ask me, the London Olympics debacle should be the last straw. But we all know that more failures lie ahead unless a drastic change is implemented as soon as possible.

Saying that the Filipinos will not succeed in the Olympics is ridiculous. No doubt the talent is there. Otherwise, the country would not have produced world champions in non-Olympic sports like professional boxing, practical shooting, wushu, bowling, billiards, and dragon-boat racing. The biggest challenge is nurturing that talent and transforming that athlete into a legitimate medal contender in the Olympics.

The Philippine Dragon Boat Federation won overall champions with 5 golds and 2 silver medals in the 10th IDBF World Championships in Tampa, Florida.

To do that, a change in the present system is badly needed.

The consensus among sports columnists and sports-loving individuals is the need for a major facelift in the country’s sports agencies and an entire system overhaul. Parties are pushing for abolishing the Philippine Sports Commission and replacing it with a new governing body. There are also those calling for the ouster of POC president Peping Cojuangco, who has held this position since 2004.

Despite the declining performance of Philippine sports under his term, Cojuangco is reportedly still keen on running for a third term as POC president. And the alarming note here is that there are no challengers for the said post. Names like Ricky Vargas, Popoy Juico, and Manny Lopez have been floated, but these are all unconfirmed. Cojuangco won a second term in 2008 when he defeated then Philippine shooting president Art Macapagal in a closely-contested election.

In the eyes of sportswriters and fans, Peping has outlived his welcome. It’s time for him to go and hand over his position to another individual. Hopefully, his successor is a visionary and not connected with the officials we have at present. As who that person is? Well, your guess is as good as mine.

 

Pinoyathletics response by Pirie Enzo

Is this the first, second, or maybe the third chance for Peping? I have already lost count.

I agree with ‘Vincex’ and ‘Peter Utol.’ The Philippines needs to bring in a new generation of sports leaders to modernize the sport. Much like what Michael Keon and Anthony Benson did with the Gintong Alay Project back in the early 1980s.

 

Regardless of his affiliations, Trillanes is right. However creating a Department of Sports won’t answer anything if the people running it don’t know anything about sports development either.

It’s like the Department of Health talking about health, or the people going to gyms exercising and achieving nothing.

It takes technique and skill. Something we have to learn from foreign entities. Just as Paquiao did.

-Vincex wrote

 

I think sports such as weightlifting, boxing (if they can convince someone to stay in amateurs long enough not to turn pro), and Bowling (if it becomes an Olympic sport) are the three best. The Philippines sports leaders are kidding themselves if they think basketball, track, and field, or swimming is where we will win Olympic gold medals. ‘THE PHILIPPINES WILL NEVER WIN AN OLYMPIC GOLD MEDAL IN BASKETBALL, TRACK, AND FIELD, OR SWIMMING.’

However, the Philippines could dominate at the SEA Games level in the above-mentioned sports if the right programs are implemented. This is where I agree with vincex, Keon, and Australian coach Anthony Benson knew what they were doing, and the Philippines reaped the benefits at sea games and even the Asian level.

Where are the Keon’s and Benson of this world now????

 

If you will just rely on the Pinoy race to naturally evolve into a world-class type of athletes, it will take a millennium. I suggest two things: Introduce Anglo or African genes into the mainstream gene pool and then accelerate the development with steroids and we will probably see some serious competitors in 2024 at the earliest.

-Peter Utol wrote

 

Also, in regards to Peter Utol. Again, there is no need to resort to PEDs, but the Philippines seems very reluctant to recruit a lot of Fil-Heritage athletes regarding what you say. Certainly, in events such as sprinting, which West Africans dominate, these genes would be favorable for the sport; read this article below.

http://pinoyathletics.com/2012/07/30…print-program/

Aswell as that, many Asian nations are already recruiting and naturalizing Kenyan, Ethiopian, Moroccan distance runners, and Nigerian sprinters into their ranks to boost their domestic pool. It is not just about importing and recruiting athletes; it’s also about making sure we have good programs in place; well-organized meets to boost our depth.

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